Breaking down the spinning wheel kick

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by dvcochran, Nov 18, 2017.

  1. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    What I need is to be 30 years younger with all original parts and none broken.
     
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  2. Gwai Lo Dan

    Gwai Lo Dan 2nd Black Belt

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    Was there a correlation between TKD and needing hip surgery?
     
  3. Gwai Lo Dan

    Gwai Lo Dan 2nd Black Belt

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    I was holding the pad for some young girls (8-10) doing spinning hook kicks. It's amazing how "off" their technique can be, yet they still do the kick reasonably well due to flexibility.
     
  4. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Gotta love the differences in terminology...
    In our branch of the MDK, there is no wheel kick. What the OP is describing we would call a spinning hook kick, which is what you call a reverse turning kick. The Chang Hon turning kick is equivalent to our roundhouse kick. We do teach a reverse (or spinning) roundhouse, but I've always found it awkward (though deceptive...) and I don't think I'll get into the mechanics in this thread, to avoid derailing it.
    The Chang Hon vertical kick using the outside edge of the foot would be what we call an outside crescent.

    Straight leg throughout will give more power. Bent leg with later extension will result in less power, but more a quicker turn and will be more deceptive.
    If the toes are pointing up, striking with the edge of the foot, it would be a crescent kick; if they're parallel to the ground, striking with the heel or ball of the foot, it would be a hook kick.

    Spinning is rearward. The kick can be done by turning forward, but that is mostly to be deceptive. The forward turn can be used to make it look like you're throwing a round house (what you would call a turning kick) to the ribs, encouraging them to block that side of the body. The leg is kept flexed till it passes the body, then extended and the heel brought back into the head from the side opposite where the roundhouse would be expected to land.

    Life tears up joints. Trying to prove that a single activity out of allllllll the ones we engage in caused the need for surgery would be impossible.
     
  5. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Not exactly. When I was almost 50 I found out i was born with a misalignment in my hips. Gave great insight into why I always had trouble getting my foot to point slightly downward for side piercing kicks. I was told that this condition if discovered today in youngsters while growing is addressed with braces etc. but I was way past that stage. Doc said people with that issue will need hip replacement. At that time I had no pain but a couple of years later I had to have it.

    I am sure that impact training, such as running (Did one Marathon) and kicking exceedingly heavy bags played a role. In the 1970's it was a thing to brag how we were mashing 80-100lb bags. He Il Cho writes in one of his books not to use any bag over 60lbs because it is too jarring. Don Wilson opined that martial artists have issues because anatomically the hip joint is built to take impact when from the leg in a standing alignment but the impact angle for side kicks is much different.
     
  6. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Not exactly. You are correct that the "Round House" kick is similar to the Chang Hon "Turning Kick" or more accurately the "Side Turning Kick" since the Tuning kick is for a target approximately 45 degrees to the front while the side turning kick (You have turned sideways) is to a target straight ahead.

    Reverse turning is so named because the body rotates opposite or reverse direction of the turning kick. The Usual tool / contact surface is the heel or it could be the sole if the foot is pointed.

    Spinning hook sounds more like what we would call Reverse hook. Similar in rotation and execution to reverse turning except the leg is mostly extended until it's about 15 degrees before the target and then the knee bends sharply. This sharp bend of the knee for the reverse hook kick increases the speed of the tool which is why this is the kick of choice for suspended breaks as opposed to a reverse turniing kick whichi would have a leg that is mostly straight throughout.
     
  7. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The big difference seems to be (not shockingly...) terminology. What you're giving separate names we just call variations of the kick.
     

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