Best Martial Arts system for Bodyguarding?

Discussion in 'Ask The MT Advisory Board' started by STRIKER11b, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. STRIKER11b

    STRIKER11b White Belt

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    I am brand new to Martial Talk and have browsed around in your forums, and feel that this would be the right place to seek some advice.

    I'm at an entry level in the civilian Close Protection/Executive Protection business and have been seriously looking into some martial arts systems.
    I have experience with hostage situations and close protection elsewhere, so I know what i'm looking for; but i'm somewhat clueless in the world of martial arts.
    My aim is to begin practicing in a martial arts system that has an influence on the following:

    1) Staying on your feet.
    2) Gaining/regaining/obtaining control of hostile situations with possible weapons and multiple attackers as fast as possible. Situational awareness will be a must-have.
    3) Application of weapons (i.e.: disarming, weapon control and retention).
    4) Most IMPORTANTLY: physical protection of another individual (or several individuals).

    Protecting the client will be the #1 most important aspect of this job; so a martial arts system that compliments the training that I already have will be most beneficial.
    I have been looking at Krav Maga, EPAK Kenpo, and Kajukenbo. I've been looking at each of these martial arts systems because of how fast and effective they appear to be; however, I have been looking deeper into Krav Maga because it appears that this martial arts system uses weapons that are most commonly used by common day attackers, has a heavy influence on defense against multiple attackers (even with weapons), it has a good reality based approach, and according to word of mouth it doesn't take many years to learn or become effective in. It is also apparently the martial arts system used by the Israeli Defense Forces (a plus) and is used by some high ranking official's bodyguards in Brazil (another plus).

    What do you guys think?
    If weighed on a scale, which one of these martial arts systems would be the one you'd most recommend for my type of situation? Why, and what differs it from the others to be the most recommended one for my situation?

    1) Krav Maga
    2) EPAK Kenpo
    3) Kajukenbo

    Thank you all for your inputs on this topic.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  2. seasoned

    seasoned MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    With my system background in Okinawan GoJu, I can attest to the fact that it will take toooo long for your liking. But, my daughter took Krav Maga as a second art from her 10 years in GoJu and found it to be very well rounded in modern weaponry and combat concepts.
     
  3. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    Combatives. Army/police combatives. Teaches you some basic gross motor skill high
    Percent attacks. Next fire arms. Third teaser knife and stick.
    A lot of the arts depend on the teacher. A good teacher
    Can give you what you need if you express your concern and goals.

    I think you should do private or semi private because
    You need to gain proficiency in a short time. I think
    A class setting isn't ideal for someone who is looking
    To learn as part of profession. Just my opinion. Don't
    Look into the style that causes you to over look quality teacher.
     
  4. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    You don't want martial arts for work as a bodyguard. You want to take a tailored program aimed at your needs. Then you can look at a martial art to further hone your skills and to reinforce those skills, if you want. That said -- from your list, Krav Maga generally offers the closest in their instructional model, and there are more specific combative/protective programs available within some of the Krav Maga organizations. See, for example, Krav Maga World Wide's Force Protection programs. Kajukenbo might be the next choice, though it seems to be kind of variable school to school.
     
  5. STRIKER11b

    STRIKER11b White Belt

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    I have an extensive background in MACP, SOCP, and even MCMAP. Obviously, MACP was the basic foundation of everything, as it was broken down into levels (1-4). What many people don't realize is that MACP blends old Army combatives with new Army combatives and the entire point of MACP is all about getting back to your tools by using whatever mean's necessary. Use whatever weapon that can be used, even if a rock, a stick, or a shard of glass is lying around (this is why we're issued KABAR combat knives). However, these days we do not fight hand to hand like during the days of the Spartans, Romans, or the Trojans; so we are not experts of hand to hand combat unless we've received further training outside of the military. The military does not offer you training to become some Chuck Norris/Steven Seagal martial arts guru; it offers the most effective and fastest training to get back up on your feet and get back to your tools as quickly as possible. Fighting hand to hand and with knives IS very heavily emphasized in COMBAT units to give a long jump on edge (if there's time); but not very often, if at all, in other units. And really and truly, we spent more time with our weapons (firearms) than we did with anything else during my entire time in the military (even more time spent than with the "woodline"/toilet lol). Next came our bayonets, and then came hand to hand; but military hand to hand is all about gaining a dominant position, creating distance, getting back to your tools, and using those tools.
    In my Ranger Batt. we trained in SOCP. I cross-trained in MCMAP during my 7 years of service, and got damn good at it and found the approaches, principles and techniques useful - however, I used it as what it's intended purpose should be, and that's getting back to your tools. "The man who gets to a weapon first is usually the one who wins the fight -- every single time." Meaning, "Stop trying to use your body (trying to be Bruce Lee) and start using your brain. This isn't an action movie; this is reality and there are loaded firearms everywhere."

    Police combatives (usually PPCT in the U.S.) take a different approach than military combatives; Police combatives takes a far less lethal approach with far less lethal techniques involved. Police combatives are about restraint and control, and levels of force (just like military combatives once you get into the higher levels). See, military combatives teaches you to begin at level 6 (use of lethal force), rather than like with Police combatives, which teach you to begin at level one and then elevate as the given situation escalates. Once you're at level 4 MACP or at a black belt in MCMAP, you're just as effective as an LEO in restraint and control. I would strongly agree that LEO's generally [should] train in the use of hand to hand combatives more so than military personnel (no matter what their profession: standard Grunts, Special Forces, etc.), as in their world the use of lethal force (#1 being firearms) is to be used as a last resort, as to where a soldier's use of lethal force (#1 being firearms) is generally mandatory.
    In the military, we also use tazers, OC Spray, and CS gas very heavily for many different reasons (including being the victims of these types of attacks and building tolerance levels to the above described non-lethal tools or weapons).
    We also train fairly extensively in arrest techniques for EPWs (enemy prisoners of war); but are a bit more brutal than the Police [in most cases] are.

    I am no longer in the military as of this year, and am at an entry level in this field, so what I am searching for is something to further hone the training that I already have; therefore, I believe that it has been confirmed that Krav Maga is perhaps the best martial arts program to take advantage of for this approach?

    See, again, the #1 focal point is protection of the client; but the use of lethal force is always to be used as a last resort, just like with law enforcement. I do not intend on taking it to a higher level than necessary with any aggressors; but will obviously do what I have to. I believe most have seen the "Justin Bieber's Israeli Commando Bodyguard Gets Embarrassed On Camera By The Angry Paparazzi" video. In my opinion, the man there should have been handled with level 5 (out of 6) use of force by the Bodyguards, when they were only using level 3. They should have neutralized the situation as quickly as possible without causing severe injury or death to the Paparazzi. That situation could have easily gotten way out of hand and ended up with the client injured, or even killed.

    Continuing on... Most people do not attack with swords and nunchaku, and if they're really dead set on premeditatedly attacking an individual that requires a close protection agent in the first place; they'll most likely be using a firearm, a sharp object, or a stick/club of some sort.
    I've got the use of firearms out of the way, now i'm looking for something that is emphasized on reaction to a knife/sharp object, and blunt object type attack. For situations where I may not permitted to carry a firearm; this will be extra crucial, especially if there are multiple attackers.

    I think it's Krav Maga, after reading the posts here. What do you guys think?
    Are there any other martial arts systems recommendable that I could possibly look into so I can see if there are any schools available in my area?
    The reason i'm asking is that there are only a few Krav Maga schools here; but if I end up finding nothing but low quality schools, i'd like to know what else is out there that would be recommend for my situation.
    I apologize if my further inquiries are further, in any way, frustrating.

    Thanks again for your consideration. Very much appreciated.
     
  6. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng All weight is underside

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    Old days in China and Taiwan they liked Bajiquan but these days in China I believe they use non-sports Sanshou and Taiwan has there own system, but I do not know what it is called, I believe it use to be Chung I Chuan but I do not think that is what they use these days in Taiwan

    Other than that I have nothing to add that has not already been said
     
  7. zDom

    zDom Senior Master

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    If you were in or near Cape Girardeau, I would say your answer is "Moo Sul Kwan Hapkido" : )

    If you are in or near St. Louis, I would say "Bong Yul Shin's Judo Class" (Shin is who the Busch family chose for executive protection, for what it is worth).

    But you are where you are so I would recommend you go and watch all the local instructors. Don't get hung up on the name or reputation of the art; go watch and figure out what instructor near you is offering what you are looking for.

    With your background, you should be able to tell the difference between a "paper tiger" and someone who can help you stack the odds in your favor in unarmed combat.

    Best of luck to ya!
     
  8. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    Did you see your back around to assess the schools in your area. Find one you think will meet your needs.

    Sent from my Ally using Tapatalk

    EDIT: Yeah... like that makes sense! Let's try it this way:

    Use your background to assess the schools in your area. Find the one that you think will fit your needs best. And don't be afraid to change your mind... Don't get hung up on which style.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
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  9. STRIKER11b

    STRIKER11b White Belt

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    Thank you all very much for your input. If anyone else has any input or recommendations in the future, it will be much appreciated!
     
  10. C0550r

    C0550r White Belt

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    To be honest, forget the Krav Maga, and whatever other stuff like that there is. Do some plain and simple Thai boxing, 8 points of attack that's what you need if you ever see yourself needing to defend yours and others lives. Maybe do some bjj as well if you ever get taken down which I doubt would happen but you never know, it's always useful. For the weapon unarming you'll learn that with the company your with or military, whoever you work for you will learn it there. I might be a bit late replying compared to everyone else, but consider it still.

    PS: on my account it says I'm a white belt, just to inform you I'm not. I have a 7th dan black belt in Karate, 2nd dan in kickboxing and I'm currently fighting semi professional Mixed martial arts (cage fighting). I haven't figured out how to change it yet haha
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    I think that it's very likely the OP has made a choice and moved on. Heck, in five years he might be teaching a course by now. :)
     
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  12. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Welcome to MT. Your white belt signifies you as a newbie here on this site, has nothing to do with your martial arts qualifications. The way to change it is to hang around and post. perhaps go across to the ' introductions' bit and say hello?
     
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  13. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    You may have to abbreviate all that text considerably so it will fit in the little space that currently just says 'white belt' ;) just kidding, welcome along!!
     
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  14. hoshin1600

    hoshin1600 Senior Master

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    im just a little curious...what style is your 7th degree black belt in? your profile says your only 27 years old.
     
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  15. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Welcome to MartialTalk, C0550r.
     
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