Bennefits of studying Judo?

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by BmillerWarrior, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    I'm sorry friend but your understanding of Judo throws is superficial. Yes, they are "traditionally" taught as jacket grips but that certainly doesn't require those grips most of the time. As an example, Koshi Guruma is "traditionally" taught with a sleeve pull. But it is child's play to switch from a sleeve grip to a wrist or elbow grip for no-jacket throwing. In fact, this is the way that old school pugilistic throws analogous to Koshi Guruma, a sub-set of the Cross-Buttock, were performed.

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    To claim that Judo depends upon or even requires the jacket grips is simply a misunderstanding.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  2. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    O Soto Gari? Seriously? I teach O Soto "no gi" all the time. The pugilism version is called Back-Heel.

    Allanson-Winn_Back-Heel.jpg

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  3. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    The version I teach looks similar to that, just move the hand grips. His right hand would ideally be in almost an overhook position, pulling toward his hip. His left hand would ideally be above the opposite elbow and underneath the arm (does that make sense?), pushing toward his opponent's ear. That puts the opponent in basically the same position. In fact, now I want to play a bit with the position in that picture to see what feels different. It's a versatile technique (especially as broadly as we view it as our "Leg Sweep"), and one I resort to rather readily.
     
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  4. lklawson

    lklawson Senior Master

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    Quite a bit of variation in "no gi" options. Here are two from Edwards and one from "Gunner" Moir. Edwards-Back-Heel-1.jpg Edwards-Back-Heel-2.jpg Gunner_Moir-Backheel.jpg

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
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  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    The first two are quite similar to variations I've taught and used (used the first one - the double-leg variation) to shut down a BB who was being too rough with yellow belt students. The more I think about it, the more I think this might be my favorite technique, though not necessarily the one I use the most.
     
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  6. PiedmontChun

    PiedmontChun Blue Belt

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    You watch a couple White Belt / Yellow Belt level Judo tournaments.... and you see a ton of mediocre Osoto Gari attempts. Its pretty instinctive to sweep / trip / throw someone by attacking the back of their supporting leg, which is why some variation of it seems to be in nearly every fighting system and people also take to it quickly as a "go to" technique. There is a lot of nuance there though.
    In Judo, the sleeve grip on the elbow of the gi really helps unbalance the opponent and 'load' their weight onto the leg you are attacking, but the throw is still there without it. The mid / high lapel grip really helps drive the opponent back and makes for a more explosive throw, but hooking on the back of their neck and bracing your forearm / elbow into their chest if there is no gi works too. Even in the gi, I remember our Judo club working a variant that looked a bit like a clothesline - no grips, just our normal lapel gripping hand coming across the body and driving the opponent backward as we stepped thru and attacked the leg. There are so many ways to make a throw like that work, some better, some more crude, but because the basic mechanics exist in all of them.
     
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  7. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    I apologize, I am gay and just needed someone to give me some attention. I love MMA Guys!
     
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  8. BmillerWarrior

    BmillerWarrior Guest

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    I apologize, I am gay and just needed someone to give me some attention. I love MMA Guys!
     
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  9. kravmaga1

    kravmaga1 Yellow Belt

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    Benefits of learning Judo are:
    • Developing physical fitness.
    • Growth in strength and flexibility.
    • Increased speed and agility.
    • Greater endurance.
    • Good static and dynamic balance.
    • Improved reaction time.
    • Excellent coordination.
    • Increased self-confidence.
     

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