Ask Me Anything Korean Language Related

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by KangTsai, Sep 2, 2016.

  1. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Only people from jejudo. Most are different on the same "severity" of British vs. American, but Jejudo vs. Satndard is like Jamaican patois to standard.
     
  2. Finlay

    Finlay Green Belt

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    I have a question about Korean terminology

    the term 'uke' in Japanese was incorrectly translated as to block, i believe the meaning is actually closer 'to receive'

    Was there a similar mistranslation in taekwondo with the term 'makgi'?
     
  3. TrueJim

    TrueJim 3rd Black Belt

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    I'm not an expert, but I've ready elsewhere that makgi means to interrupt or forestall. So to your point, it doesn't really mean "block" per se. You're not blocking the opponent's attack, you're interrupting it. :)
     
  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    That's interesting. I've never actually heard "uke" used to mean "to block". I've always used "uke" to mean the person receiving the technique, and "ukemi" refers to the body of techniques that person will use (mostly referring to falls and rolls, but also including delivering good attacks, etc.). At least one of those is probably a mistranslation, too. Mind you, we don't use a lot of Japanese in our training, so it may be more commonly used that way than my experience shows.
     
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  5. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Nah, it just means blocking. We. Must. Be Accurate. Dangit.
     
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  6. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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    The Japanese names of the "blocks"* in karate generally include the word "uke", as in "Jodan Uke" (upper block).
    [​IMG]

    I think the literal translation is something closer to "receive", as in you are receiving the punch and handling it appropriately. For arts in the jujutsu family of course, uke is the person receiving the technique being demonstrated.

    *(If you read enough threads in the Karate forums you will see there is considerable debate regarding the "correct" meaning and application of these techniques. Are they blocks, strikes, parries, grappling techniques hidden in the bunkai, all of the above, something else? Opinions vary widely.)
     
  7. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    A lot of us just think they are there to be used in whichever way is the most effective at the time you need them.
     
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  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Interesting. Both my Karate instructors (lo, those many years ago) used English names for everything.
     
  9. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    I've always had them in Japanese too.
     
  10. Finlay

    Finlay Green Belt

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    OK

    So here's another one what is the Korean equivalent of bunkai
     
  11. Metal

    Metal Green Belt

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    풀이 puri - explanation

    That's what the KTA is using for "Taekwondo Poomsae Explanation".
     
  12. andyjeffries

    andyjeffries Master of Arts

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    분해 - Boonhae (literally: interpretation)

    Source: I asked my friend Master Jeong In-Choul (expert and author of multiple books on applying Taekwondo to the real world)
     
  13. Martial D

    Martial D 3rd Black Belt

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    Can you translate Hyunas smash hit, Bubble Pop, in its entirety?
     
  14. andyjeffries

    andyjeffries Master of Arts

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    I don't know what book you are referring to but Grandmaster Kang Ik-pil's book "The explanation of official Taekwondo poomsae II" is titled in Korean "태권도 공인품새 해설" (Taekwondo Kongin Poomsae Haeseol) means literally Taekwondo official-poomsae explanation/commentary/interpretation.

    The equivalent word for Bunkai is definitely Boonhae. From my understanding those involved in creating the Kukkiwon poomsae have stated that there are no hidden applications beyond the movements present, so while the word is there, the hidden applications that people think of as Bunkai have no direct equivalent.
     
  15. Metal

    Metal Green Belt

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    I'm referring to the "KTA Taekwondo Poomsae Application" (KTA 태권도 품새 풀이) book:

    KTA 태권도 품새풀이 (QR)

    Same publisher as the book from Kang Ik-Pil.

    Anyway, as there are several words to say it in English there are also several ways to say it in Korean. Just like terms for techniques there may be several rights. ;-)
     
  16. andyjeffries

    andyjeffries Master of Arts

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    Hahaha, you're right there ;-)

    I think in this case though, Bunkai and Boonhae share the same Hanja.
     
  17. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Hi guys. I am not dead and I declare this thread still relevant. I've gone for about a month and a half.
     
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  18. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    Have you felt neglected? :(
     
  19. Rough Rider

    Rough Rider Green Belt

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    As part of my self-study, I'm translating our classroom commands that are only said in English, into Korean. At the end of each class, before we bow out, the instructor says "Turn around, kneel down, and fix your uniform."

    I've got "Turn around" 뒤로 돌아 and "Fix your uniform" 도복단정. Can you help me out with "Kneel down"?
     
  20. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    "Fix your uniform" would be something like 도복정리, although I don't know if Korean classes say it at all. I don't know if they say 뒤로돌아 either, as it's informal and such commands would be said in noun form and not imperative. For kneel, it would probably be 무릅! or 무릅꿇어.
     

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