Ask Me Absolutely Anything About Korean Speaking and Phonics

Discussion in 'Korean Culture and History' started by KangTsai, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    With the amount of people training taekwondo and the like forced to learn at least a tiny bit of broken Korean from their instructors, please ask me to correct, define or refine anything.

    Qualifications:
    Am Korean
    I translate Korean to English for written documents (essays, CVs).
     
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  2. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Can you read old Korean?

    I would like to know what this says especially the parts (besides the name and date) that were hand written in.
    Thanks
     

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  3. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Oh one more.
    But I think this is written in Chinese.
    Correct?
     

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  4. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Most of that's Chinese. The Korean script is actually very young, and up until the 1980's ish Chinese was used always in formal stuff. Like everyone, I can't read Chinese, it's like "This person has ____________________________________ therefore ___________________________________________ did ____________."
     
  5. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Korean was once entirely written in Chinese, depends if it is Korean or not.
     
  6. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Its the blank part I need to know tho.
    LOL!

    So did the Korean people migrated from China and did they speak Chinese or was it Chinese writing with Korean pronunciation and thats why they stopped using Chinese characters?
     
  7. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    The relationship between Chinese and Korean language is similar to the relationship between Latin and English. Chinese characters were used as written language in Korea up until King Sejong of the Joseon period established Korean Script. Chinese script became increasingly obsolete overtime.
     
  8. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Ohh....ok.
    I never knew that.
    Always wonder.
    Thanks
     
  9. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    I was able to spend some time in Masan, South Korea, back in 2001, doing some work for a telecommunications company. It was a great experience, and the people I met there were some of the friendliest, nicest, people I have ever met in my life. I really enjoyed my time there.
     

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  10. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    Basically a degree from Kim ji Huang in tansudo which I think is taekwondo now if you need a certain hanzi character let me know which one
     
  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Is "tansudo" the same as Tang Soo Do?
     
  12. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    Yep same hanzi
     
  13. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    What's a hanzi
     
  14. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    Chinese writing in Japanese it's called kanji I think Koreans call it hanja
     
  15. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Ok.
    I do have an old pic of my teacher in Korea back in the 50's with some writing in the back ground but every time I ask a Korean to translate it they say its old Korean and they cant read it. :)
     
  16. Kinghercules

    Kinghercules Blue Belt

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    Ok here's and other one. I tried to get two angles as best as I can.
    Capture13.JPG Capture00014789.JPG
     
  17. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    It is from Kim ji Huang again, 1982 for tang soo do. I can only read the Chinese if there is a certain part on it you want me to read let me know.
     
  18. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    You apparently have family ties and no doubt spoke/speak Korean at home. I really don't speak Korean, but have spent time there, and long ago, studied the language and culture. But in that you have the advantage over me. However, I am somewhat familiar with English.

    There isn't a direct line from Latin to English. English is a germanic language that picked up a lot from other germanic languages. The Latin influence comes from the Norman conquest and the attempt to force everyone to speak French, which is a Latin derivative. American English picked up more from the Spanish it encountered in the southwest.

    From my limited study, Korean picked up some Chinese culture and language from their political and social contacts with different dynasties. They used Chinese in their contacts with China, adopting the Chinese writing. They were for much of their existence, under the suzerainty of China. The relationship was stronger or weaker over time.

    But it provided the vehicle for the adoption of many Chinese borrow words in the language. The words for airplane, airport, and bank are ones I remember being assimilated. However, they generally did not bring over the tones used Chinese. I don't recall the word now, but one word I learned in Korean had a tone when I heard it, the same one I had learned in Vietnamese. It was the only 'Korean' word I ever heard with tone.

    EDIT: The example depicted by Kinghercules is an example of how the Koreans used to write, with a mixture of Chinese and Korean characters. I never learned how they knew when to use the Chinese characters and when not. I know it was often used in writing when it was important to differentiate between clans. Where Korean might pronounce several clan names the same, and they would be written the same, using the Chinese characters allowed the differentiation.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2016
  19. KangTsai

    KangTsai 2nd Black Belt

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    Think of Chinese characters in Korean like this: 'asleep' is a purely Anglo-Saxon, therefore English word, which derives nothing from any other language. However, 'telescope' is not: it comes from Latin 'telescopium' and Greek 'teleskopos.'
    Korean pronunciations of Chinese characters e.g. 火 is read 화 with the meaning of 불(fire), is generally used in compound words in speaking. However in that old formal method of writing both Korean and Chinese at the same time, Chinese characters may be used to also be read as the meaning rather than the character. So instead of 米가 없다 being read as 미가없다, it would be interpreted as 쌀이없다. It's formal because it's inefficient I would say.
     
  20. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I not sure I get that all. But then as I said I am not a Korean speaker nor writer. I can read the characters, but I may not know where one word ends and another begins, and even then, probably won't know more than one word of many. I am aware that some Chinese words are used for instance, to denote a day of the week, Tuesday in your example of fire-day. In restaurants Chinese characters are, or at least used to be used for amounts of money.

    But none of that really relates to the fact that Chinese words entered the Korean language due to spending so much time under the suzerainty of China. It only gives examples of what some of the words were. My point above was about how the adoption occurred. That was my bad as it really didn't relate to the OP's question about translating a document, other than your statement that English is derived from Latin. That myth has been around for a long time. I can remember a teacher telling me that in the 50s.
     

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