Anybody on here used martial arts for self defense?

Discussion in 'Women of the Martial Arts (Women Martial Artists)' started by Tiberius, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. Hudson69

    Hudson69 Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    414
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Colorado
    I am an LEO in a City of over 500,000; I have the opportunity to employ the skills I have learned, first in various martial arts classes, then the military and of late with law enforcement.

    Surprisingly on the few times I have had to actually go "hands on" it has been one or two strikes, an elbow or at least one of those and a low kick followed up by handcuffing/restraining which involved joint locks to gain full compliance.

    I agree with Chris Parker, or at least I think I do, in that the martial arts are not "self defence" they are combative oriented skills and the title self defense is a term to keep liability low.

    My .02 only
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. MariaK

    MariaK Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2011
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Yes, a lot... not martial arts (there were no martial art schools when I was growing up in Russia) but pure fighting. The earliest memories from when I was 6-7 years old - stray dogs and dogs of alcoholic neighbours attacking me. So, this is how I leant to stand completely still and then when the dog is trying to bite you - to do explosive kicks right into its muzzle. It was probably the scariest experience, especially trying to compose yourself before the attack and not to run. Then we had 2 civil wars in Chechnya and as a result an awful criminal situatin in 1990s when police was not better then criminals, so you learn very quickly how to evaluate a potential attack coming and make necessary moves to evade it. When there is a direct attack - you fight like mad (even without the proper knowledge of MAs) - as you are fighting for you life. Everything goes... Once I and my mother were attacked by a band of gypsies in the market. We had a heavy bag made of artificial leather, they had knives. But it was not scary - as we could use the bag as a shield against knives and an attack lasted just several minutes. Although the bag was shredded to pieces... :). Once I was attacked by a guy when walking my dog. He wanted to grab me - but I hit him first and then shouted and cursed him that I will kill him if he continues the attack. So, he left. Once I almost died (in my ealry 20s) - I noticed a guy too late while walking - he almost grabbed me. But I ran (he was chasing me) and crossed railroad tracks before the coming train at full speed. So, it took me several days to calm down nerves after I undestood how easily I could have been run down by the train.

    In general, I would say - MAs are nice, but in the USA (I now live in the USA) they are teaching mostly sport versions - it's irrelevant in real combat fighting. Primary necessity is to watch out for potentially dangerous situations and psycholgically be prepared to fight to death, blood etc. Then rely on your speed, disengage and run away. What techniques...hmmm...depends on the position of the attacker and what the attacker is wearing as clothes. Like if it's winter time - the person will be in heavy coat - so you are limited to knees, feet and face, head, no kicks/punches will penetrate a heavy coat. If it's summer time - easier - more variants to cause damage (wearing high heels in summer also gives you a nice weapon to use :)). Also watch for height and weight - 3 times heavier than you - you have speed advantage, shorter than you - you can try to engage into a long fight - the longer you are fighting, the more chances are that there will be people around who will help you. I mean usually attackers (by my experience) aim at short attacks lasting several minutes, the longer, the more noisy the fight is - the more chance for your survival.

    Hope this helps,
    Maria
     
  3. softstylist

    softstylist White Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    australia
    I have used my jujutsu a few times over last couple of years but I have been suprised how little striking I did it was mainly locks and restraining the guy but I think I threw one down once. I found that once the people new they where up against someone who was not the victim they thought they where and the tables had been turned they where very afraid. I wont go into the specific techniques I used but this thread shows that any art can work on the street and its more about the person using it than which art is better.

    OH! i will say that I was very afraid too and most people are in those situations its just not letting it control you.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2011
  4. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

    • LifeTime Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    Messages:
    14,567
    Likes Received:
    3,176
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Location:
    Pueblo West, CO
    I work in an ER, which means we get a certain percentage who are going to end up being restrained for various reasons. I am pretty sure Hudson69 and I first met across one of these people. :)
    Unlike him, I don't get a taser or pepper spray, and don't generally have the option of striking. I do, however, use a LOT of throws, takedowns, joint locks and pressure points at work.
    As far as striking goes, I've done that too. In a thread which (essentially) started with the claim that high kicks are never effective outside a sport setting, I posted a fairly detailed description of the mugging that cost me an eye.

    Let me say that I also agree that self-defense stops when the fighting starts. Self-defense is avoiding the fight. In the ER, that means getting the aggressive patient under control BEFORE they take a poke at someone. On the street it means not getting into situations that might require violence. Once it turns violent, the goal is not self-defense. It's finishing the conflict as quickly as possible, with no more injury than absolutely necesasary.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Cyriacus

    Cyriacus Senior Master

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    3,827
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Australia
    Self Defense and Fighting can be easily Confused, I certainly Agree.
    Self Defense is putting Yourself into a, how shall we say, Beneficial Position, and attempting to Circumvent a Risk.
    It can also be Your Initial Motion as You Initiate Fighting.
    But Fighting is relatively Senseless by Comparison.

    Its nice to see the Distinction is becoming more and more commonly Recognised.
    Incidentally, now Im going to go find the Thread You Mentioned about High Kicks and Your Eye.
     
  6. luckiest

    luckiest White Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I tried defence once but it didn't work because I was against sheer strength and had been squashed to the ground too quickly. I think this experience is something that will always stress me out.
     
  7. seasoned

    seasoned MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

    • LifeTime Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    10,625
    Likes Received:
    644
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Somewhere out there
    The first time I tried walking I fell down, but I was only a very young toddler. With years of practice, I was able to get around without even thinking about it, even running. :)
    Now on to a more serious mind set. At first, we learn martial arts, or any other endeavor. In time, and with much dedication, we move from a learning experience to the owning stage. Once we own and internalize, it now becomes a part of us. The stages of martial arts IMO would be (1) Learn (2) memorize (3) forget.
    The forgetting stage is where we can function without though, just proper action, all done with beforehand preparation of proper training.

    luckiest, do try to learn from your experience and move on to growth, but above all, don't dwell on the past. This will only hamper you in the future. :soapbox: Now moving off my soapbox, good luck...............
     
  8. seasoned

    seasoned MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

    • LifeTime Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    10,625
    Likes Received:
    644
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Somewhere out there
    Also, please move on to the Meet and Greet thread, and properly introduce yourself. See you around............. :)
     
  9. Sukerkin

    Sukerkin Have the courage to speak softly

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    • LifeTime Supporting Member
    • Martial Talk Alumni
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    15,316
    Likes Received:
    478
    Trophy Points:
    193
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    Just what I was going to recommend, my friend :D.
     
  10. Emanuelle

    Emanuelle White Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    A couple of years ago,after a party, friend dropped me on a street about 10 minutes from my house. To get home, I needed to walk through some poorly alleys to get home, so I called and let my mum know and to expect me soon. As I made the call I noticed I was being followed by two young men, as soon as I put my phone away they started running towards me, panicking I ran, only to be overtook and cornered. After a few choice crude expletives on their part, one of them lunged towards me, I reacted instinctively kicked him in the neck and punched the other one in the groin and ran as fast I could. I was only 15 at the time, and that incident really shook me.

    I like to think I've come a long way since then, I realised that I won't always be so lucky, so I make sure I'm more careful now.
     
  11. Instructor

    Instructor Master Black Belt

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,268
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Location:
    Gloucester, VA
    I have and my training carried me through. I did have to improvise some moves that weren't taught to me, but my instructor taught me to improvise so maybe it was taught!

    I personally don't see anything shameful about defending yourself. If somebody attacks you, you do what you have to do.

    In regards to striking, grappling, etc. Learn as much as you can and try to have a response to as many situations as you can think of. It never hurts to have a few extra tools in your toolbox if you know what I mean.
     
  12. Shai Hulud

    Shai Hulud Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    131
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    St. Petersburg
    Aye, once. Still replays in my mind with crystal-clear definition. Back in August.

    It was on a jerk on the way home from my university. An elbow, trap, jab, return elbow and a head-first shove onto a dumpster lid.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    15,126
    Likes Received:
    3,249
    Trophy Points:
    308
    I hammer locked a guy dressed as a banana over the weekend.

    Lucky I didn't slip over.
     
  14. hussaf

    hussaf Green Belt

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Kicked in the neck and punched in the groin?? Sounds like you mixed the two, lol. Seriously though, why would your friend drop you off that far from home?
     
  15. Shai Hulud

    Shai Hulud Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2014
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    131
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    St. Petersburg
    Very droll.:rofl:

    Not to mention slipping while applying a hammer lock to someone would probably result in a dislocation, or at the very least a terrific sprain.
     
  16. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    15,126
    Likes Received:
    3,249
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Strangely you can break the arm. It goes above the elbow. Probably physics or something.
     
  17. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

    • MartialTalk Mentor
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    7,624
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Maui
    Not to sound all "Master Po" (from Kung-Fu TV) but I think we use Martial Arts for self defense all the time. If you train someplace with a lot of males who are fight training all the time, you learn to deal with, and be comfortable around, males who like to fight. It transfers into our daily lives without even knowing it. Being comfortable allows you to recognize and diffuse so many things.

    Training with gals who like to fight is a different story. Scary people. :)
     
  18. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

    • Martial Talk Alumni
    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Messages:
    11,610
    Likes Received:
    842
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Spokane Valley WA
    I have been in a few real fights, and the move that always seem to amaze the onlookers and myself, is a good knee strike to an incoming straight kick. Your knee just need to be there, and the guy will fly through the air and land on his head. I done that twice, now. :)
     
  19. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

    • Martial Talk Alumni
    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Messages:
    11,610
    Likes Received:
    842
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Spokane Valley WA
    You should have the skill to take any tech and finish with a choke out, but getting away is cool too. :)
     
  20. FF1994

    FF1994 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Did the groin kick disable him or was it not very effective?
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

i used my martial arts on a violent patient