About Your children in martial arts

Discussion in 'Women of the Martial Arts (Women Martial Artists)' started by Arsen, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    What about Your children in martial arts?
    Best age to start? What kind of sport to choose? Any problems?
    Competitions? What about motivation?

    My kid is 8 years old, he is going in for muay thai since he was 6. Ivan is totally crazy with this sport...
    Trains 6 times in a week. Takes part in all possible regional and national ukrainian competitions.
    He asked me to help to create his own youtube channel Muay Thai Kids.
    He wants to be professional sportsman. Should I afraid?
    (No problems with school, but we are at 3rd grade now - what will be further...?)
     
  2. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    Very common story in Thailand. I personally wouldn't want to expose my kids to the blows to the head like that. I'm a fan in general of any grappling style because you can train to application relatively safely. In the USA, BJJ and Judo are common, but wrestling is widely available through the schools. I would encourage any child interested in martial arts to start with wrestling. Even if they move on to other martial arts once they graduate, the skills and life lessons they learn in wrestling will serve them well.
     
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  3. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    Generally I agree with Your opinion. I worried about strong punches, etc...
    Than I tried to find judo club for him when he was 6.. but because of some reasons none of them didn't satisfy me...
    And than we found our pitbull with really nice coaches.
    First year he didn't take part in sparrings. Just general physical training plus basic knowledge about punch, block, foot working...
    Than kids who are ready and who wants to try began to work in pairs. With all possible equipment.. and after couple wins Ivan got "sick" with this sport. He asked me to get him on competitions to the capital - Kyiv (I had to ask my boss to give me an extra "holidays" for a week...)
    And You know what? He won! Huge competitions, more than 400 sportsman...and Ivan is winner!!!
    Since that time Muay Thai is his passion...
    This is my little story...
     
  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    In part, the answer to the question depends upon the purpose and the child. If a child has high interest, then there's more reason to start younger. If the purpose is just to get them active and around other kids and getting used to working with others in an organized environment, then any school practicing reasonable safety and encouraging those qualities will work (regardless of whether the skills being taught are even marginally martial)

    I agree with Steve about the head shots. I know a lot of arts have restricted kids from head shots. As for grappling, I do like things like BJJ and Judo for kids (BJJ seems particularly well-suited the way some folks teach it). There are some grappling moves I highly discourage for kids (joint locks that come on fast, and any small joint manipulations). So, any art that uses those extensively (like my primary art) should have an entirely different curriculum for kids, designed to eliminate those and to cater to their reduced motor control.

    I won't teach kids under 13 (currently not under 16, because I don't have time for a special kids' class), because I don't want to develop a kids' curriculum, nor teach one. But I know instructors (in NGA and other arts) who teach kids as young as 5.
     
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  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    "Kyiv" is not the spelling most would use here, but I think you're referring to the capital of Ukraine, yes?
     
  6. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    ah Americans :D
     
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  7. hoshin1600

    hoshin1600 Master of Arts

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    i watched one of his videos of sparring. while they do have protective equipment on, there is still a danger of brain damage that you will not know about until he is very much older. brain damage happens from punches and kicks but also sometimes from falling down and hitting the head on the floor.

    i understand your son loves the sport, but please be educated on the risks
    What Is CTE? | Brain Injury Research Institute

    my wife is from Thailand and i would like to see my own son practice Muay Thai but i do not enjoy the idea of him competing due to the risk involved.
    Muay Thai in Thailand is much harder than other parts of the world.

    (*** warning this video is not for everyone**)
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
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  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    The odd thing is that, if I recall correctly what my wife told me, "Kiev" is closer to the Russian pronunciation and "Kyiv" is closer to the Ukrainian. So, for all our (Americans') problems with Russia, we used their approach to how we spell it. SMH
     
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  9. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    Yes, Your wife is absolutely right. Kyiv is a capital of Ukraine. We are ukrainian speaking family. That's why Kyiv, not Kiev.
    Believe me, Americans do not have problems with russia...russia is a problem for all neighbours...
    Lucky we are - it's not a topic of this discussion, thanks to God :)
     
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  10. Tez3

    Tez3 Sr. Grandmaster

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    I was going to say we need to keep off the subject of Russia.:)
     
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  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yes, I'm well aware of the problem Russia is for its neighbors. My wife is from Zapporozhye (where Russian is the more dominant language, though everyone there speaks Ukrainian, too, of course). She still has family there, so we stay informed about what's going on.
     
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  12. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    Oh, they have sparrings only before competitions - about 3-4 times per year. And they sparring between kids +/- in the same weight. Ivan is in 24 kilograms - his friends in club do not punch as strong as teenagers. Plus equipment...
    Since autumn 2017 IFMA (international federation) prohibited competitions between kids until they will be 10.
    So, his trainings will be without tough sparrings.
    Maybe they will take part in competitions in kickboxing (2-3 times per year...).
    What is positive point in muay thai in Ukraine - we found very nice club, good stuff, responsible trainers. His passion to MT and everyday trainings has a lot of positive moments in his education. I do not worry about computer games addiction, bad company. They have rules in club - no alcohol, cigarettes and drugs - I feel comfortable with guys from his club. We are solving a lot of potential problems, that are common in modern Ukrainian society...

    I know about kids muay thai in Thailand - that's another world, another culture...I'd be against such sport for my child - it's too dangerous!
     
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  13. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    Absolutely agree
     
  14. Arsen

    Arsen White Belt

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    Oh! Please, say hello from Lutsk! :) ;)
     
  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I will pass that along. And, by the way, welcome to Martial Talk!
     
  16. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    I checked out one of the videos from the channel (assuming It's the right channel...). In the video, ithey may have protective equipment on, but it looks like they're aiming almost exclusively at the head...that's going to cause damage, especially if he's going to a competition like this every couple of months. Even more-so if his tournaments have 400 people, which (I'm guessing) means around 7 matches to make it to the finals.

    It's great that his trainers are responsible, and that you're looking towards his future in terms of going to a place that does not allow drugs/alcohol, but there still is a very real risk of CTE that you should be aware of.
     
  17. CB Jones

    CB Jones Master of Arts

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    My son started in karate when he was 4 years old. Started competing in tournaments at 6 years old...he is 12 now.

    For him the competition part of it keeps him motivated to train harder.

    We have a deal....if he wants to take it easy we will just stick to to local tournaments but if he wants to travel and compete throughout the country he has to put the work in training.

    He also plays basketball and baseball.

    I think competing in MA helped him learn to put in the work and earn what he gets back. It has helped him in all of sports and school for the simple reason that he is competitive and learned how to outwork the other kids.
     
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  18. MA_Student

    MA_Student Black Belt

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    If I ever have kids there's no way in hell I'd ever let them compete in Muay Thai until at least 18. Point fighting I'd accept but not Muay Thai. It's far to dangerous for kids. If kids want to go and learn the style and hit the bags do drills and even light spar then that's fine but getting in the ring in a full contact fight is just wrong for a child to be doing. There brains aren't fully developed there bodies aren't fully grown its just not right to put them in a full contact fight in my eyes
     
  19. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    It's difficult for me to know what to say. There are so many factors as to what the dangers are and risk. How well does your child protect his head? What is the coach like? How hard are they hitting at 8 years old? Does your son win more than he loses? How often does he compete? How often does he spar in training? There is just so much to factor.

    Not to sound horrible, but life is short and this may be something that he has a real passion for and can actually be really good in. There is also no guarantee that he'll always want to be a professional fighter. This may be a decision that he makes on his own before he turns 18.

    The only thing I can offer is to always give the body time to heal. Even if there is no damage on the outside there may be some on the inside so give the body time to heal after competitive fights.
     
  20. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    I wouldn't let my child compete if they couldn't protect their heads well enough. I place the same standards on adults in sparring.

    Outside of their brains, the stress on their young bodies isn't as much as an issue. They have a better healing rate than adults and their bodies will develop according to the stress that's being placed on it. As a child there is only so much power they are going to be able to generate. You have a couple of children who hit like a beast, but they are the exception and not the norm.

    The biggest danger would be going against those kids who are really good at fighting.
     

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