A whole lot of questions regarding the martial arts

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Elhan, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. still learning

    still learning Senior Master

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    Hello, Please take a good look at JUDO.....Aloha
     
  2. evenflow1121

    evenflow1121 2nd Black Belt

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    I am with everyone else here, bare in mind that Tekken is a video game, as far as what style, you should really do some further research on that, find schools in your area that offer Wing Chun, Krav Maga, Aikido and try to sit in a class or two. The prices of classes are also important, remember this is a long term goal for you, for anyone and chances are you would probably like to stick with a particular style for several years of your life if not make it a life term commitment. One thing I did see from what you posted, and I am glad you brought it up, was the whole issue with respect to how lethal a particular martial art can be, dont worry so much about this, and worry more about learning how to defend yourself properly at this stage. You will probably run into a better a school, and one you will probably stick with in the long run if you use this approach. I say this because far too many people like to advertise that they can teach you 'lethal blows and strikes' and what not just to get you to come into their dojo/dojang/studio, ect. One final point is try to find a school that is rooted, in other words one that does not look like its falling apart or that chances are will have to close its doors in the near future--talk to the instructor and make sure that there is some validity to what he saying, not just by word of mouth but that he or she can provide you with a certain lineage or history of whom they learned their style from, at the same time if you enter a school that is way too fancy and smells like b/s you may want to continue to look around. Best of luck in your martial arts training.
     
  3. Cirdan

    Cirdan Senior Master

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    Consider well if you plan to train in two styles at once. Not all systems are compatable. Also, you should try learning the basics of one before starting any cross training. Just my two cents.

    Good luck
     
  4. Elhan

    Elhan Guest

    Thanks for all the advice Evenflow :)

    I am planning on doing just that Cirdan; first learning one art well, and then perhaps branching out with 1-2 compatible arts to increase my moveset.
     
  5. Grenadier

    Grenadier Administrator Staff Member

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    Aikido in combination with a striking art (such as Karate) would be a very nice mixture. It never hurts to be able to grapple and strike, and, more importantly, to be familiar with the defenses involved with each.

    If you can't take the time to dedicate yourself to long term study of Aikido, Jiu-Jitsu is also an excellent art to learn. Whether it's Japanese Jiu-Jitsu, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, etc., really doesn't matter, as long as the teacher is a good one and that the school's methods are compatible with you.

    Cirdan's suggestion of focusing on one style for a while (in order to get a good set of fundamentals) is a very valid one. Not only are you getting a good base of fundamentals, but also conditioning the body. Training in one art twice a week is something that a relatively inexperienced body can still handly. Training in two arts four times a week can be too much for most folks starting out.
     
  6. Elhan

    Elhan Guest

    Thanks for the advice. What does Karate involve exactly as it's training regime and techniques? What about Jiu-Jitsu?
     
  7. Cirdan

    Cirdan Senior Master

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    The training regime of karate is grounded in the three k`s; kihon (basics), kata (forms) and kumite (sparring.) However there is a staggering ammount of styles and interpretations out there. Okinawan systems tend to focus on kata, breathing and coditioning of the body. Others may stress relaxation, balance, competition, contact sparring, gymnastics, breaking, evasion, the ability to take a punch or even knowledge of the style`s history, masters and ethics. For instance, Nanbudo wich is a modern martial art not always considered to be a karate style focuses on physical and mental health in addition to a range of unarmed techniques and also uses the staff and the wooden sword. In addition to kicks, punches, knee/elbow strikes and open handed strikes the following may or may not be found in a particular karate system; throws, ground fighting(limited), locks, vital/pressure point striking, locks, restraints, joints manipulation, traditional weapon use, knife defence and falling techniques.

    Ju jutsu focus on throws, joint locks and to varying extent ground fighting. Strikes and kicks are also present. Traditional systems may focus heavily on kata and include defence against an armed attacker as well as learning fighting with a range of (usually small) weapons. Modern systems may drop both kata and weapons and focus on sparring, competition and escape techniques for self defence. Some systems may have a greater range of kicks and punches, adapted from other arts like karate.
     
  8. Elhan

    Elhan Guest

    Sounds really interesting. My uni has Shukokai (apparently, although no details of it yet) and Shotokan Karate clubs, Tae Kwon Do, Kickboxing, Judo, Wing Chun Kung Fu and Taijiquan societies. I guess the best thing to do would be to check them all out. Tai Chi, apparently, is not that useful in self-defence, but is good for physical conditioning. Could you do it alongside say, Wing Chun or kickboxing?
     
  9. Grenadier

    Grenadier Administrator Staff Member

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    Glad to hear that there are all sorts of options available there.

    Yes, by all means, please take time to check out each one, to see which one you might like best. Remember, if something doesn't seem right to you, then don't be afraid to simply walk away.

    A combination of Shotokan Karate and Judo would be a great blend.
     
  10. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    Yes, Tai Chi would fit with just about anything.

    Some places do still teach it as self-defense, but even then it takes a long time to gain proficiency.
     
  11. kenpojujitsu

    kenpojujitsu Guest

    Krav Maga: Every new style claims to be the "ultimate", Krav Maga is no exception. This supposedly Israeli combat art was created in the U.S. by a marketing company. It is no better than what is taught at the average strip mall karate mcdojo, which is where you will find most of the schools.
    Since you are new to martial arts you may not be familiar with the term Mc Dojo, but it comes from "McDonalds". A McDojo is a place where you can go to get a black belt in a hurry without having to spend much time on silly things like training and practicing.

    Aikido - depending on what style and how you appraoch training, is hightly efficient and effective self defense. It is highly suitable for women, but is purely defensive - not offensive at all.

    Wing Chun is highly scientific and efficient. Very far removed from Aikido. It was developed by a women and is very good for women.

    Pilates is great exercise and supplemnt to a martial arts regime. Aikido does not tone the body. So if you choose Aikido, add the Pliates.
     
  12. Elhan

    Elhan Guest

    I see. Though why would the Israeli secret forces and the Russian military use it then? :confused:

    Thanks for all the info. Does Wing Chun include kicks and pressure points beyond force redirection? From what I've been told it focuses around deflection, yet it has both offensive and defensive techniques.

    Yeah I can imagine it taking long to learn in defense. It should be useful for its mental and physical benefits though.


    I'll look into them next year, when beginner's classes start again. I am thinking of going with Wing Chun and Tai Chi.
     
  13. Elhan

    Elhan Guest

    Oh, also wanted to ask, has anyone here ever heard of the Mixed Martial arts system? If so, could they tell me what it is? Apparently they also teach it at the uni.
     

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