A Few Questions.

Discussion in 'Kajukenbo' started by Hobberty, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. Hobberty

    Hobberty Yellow Belt

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    Does Kajukenbo do point sparring?
    Can you hit to the head?
    Is it reliable for self defense? How reliable on a scale of 1-10?
    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2010
  2. Big Don

    Big Don Sr. Grandmaster

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    I don't know.
    Yes, Yes I can!
    It is not reliable for self defense. HIT and DON'T GET HIT are very reliable.
    Anytime
     
  3. Hobberty

    Hobberty Yellow Belt

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    I mean are you aloud to hit to the head.
    Still need answers, thanks in advance again.
     
  4. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    I've studied at two Kaju schools and visited about 3 others, none of their in school sparring restricted head shots. That said, I know of Kaju guys who competed in Kyokushin Karate or Sabaki Challenge matches where they follow the full contact karate rules of no punches to the heads, but that wasn't their ruleset.

    I like Kaju, but I've seen not really impressive kajukenbo out there, it depends on the instructor.
     
  5. Hobberty

    Hobberty Yellow Belt

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    Okay, thanks, so you can hit to the head.
    Now I just need to know if you do point sparring.
     
  6. MJS

    MJS Administrator Staff Member

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    1) Dont know about the point sparring, but they do spar and the contact is hard.

    2) Yes, head contact is there.

    3) On a scale of 1-10, I'd definately give it a 10+.

    Perhaps you should check out some youtube clips of GM Kingis Kajukenbo school. They have some great clips of some of their black belt tests. Good stuff! :)

    BTW, have you actually made it down to any of the schools that were suggested to you, to actually watch a class? IMHO, you're going to get a much better feel for what its like, if you see it in person.

    Edit: I notice that you've started a number of threads asking about Kyokushin and Kaju, whether or not they're effective, etc. I will say the same thing that I always say....Every art has the potential to be very effective. It all comes down to how each person trains in their given art.
     
  7. jks9199

    jks9199 Administrator Staff Member

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    No, you can only hit to the head under your breath or as a whisper. If you're going to be aloud, you have to hit to the feet.

    Yes, I'm cracking on you for misspelling. Using the wrong word changed the meaning of your post dramatically, didn't it?

    You're asking the same questions about various arts. I'm going to give you the magic answer to all of them.

    EVERY art can strike to the head (yes, even aikido or judo; the word is atemi). Whether it is permitted in a particular class or exercise is at the discretion of the instructor and his/her insurance.

    Similarly, every art can do point sparring. While there are lots of ways to do it, point sparring is simply one way to practice fighting against an opponent without a script. In most forms of point sparring, you'll stop when the referee or judges think that there might be a point, as defined by the rules. In a few types, a scorekeeper will simply tally the called points. Point sparring rarely is supposed to involve seriously hard contact, so you probably won't get knocked out unless you or your partner really screw up. Point sparring is also popular in open tournaments because it'll cross styles relatively easily and doesn't require mats or a lot of other preparatory equipment.

    Self-defense is a bigger and more difficult question. It's not the art -- it's the man (or woman), and how they train. Training for self defense requires specific practices and appropriate training. If you do that -- any style will provide useful means for self defense; after all, that's what they started out as! So asking if any specific art is "good for self defense" is kind of like asking "can you find something to eat in a grocery store?"
     
  8. Wo Fat

    Wo Fat Purple Belt

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    1. Yes. See YouTube clips of fighters like Damon Gilbert or Robert Kingi for good examples.

    2. Depends on the venue. In point tournaments in Hawaii or around the SF Bay Area, the head contact is "light" (the definition of "light" in Kajukenbo means still conscious and still moving).

    3. Kajukenbo was founded on self-defense first, last and always.

    4. Reliability will always depend on the person (or their instructor), but they're both of top quality, it's one of the most reliable self-defense arts around.
     
  9. Danjo

    Danjo Master Black Belt

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    1) Our kids do point sparring and grappling. The adults train MMA and kickboxing sparring and tend to only do point sparring if we're at a point tourney, but some of the other schools like Kingi's and Bunda's mentioned above do train in both point and MMA type sparring.

    2) We hit to the head, though we do keep in mind that we're training, not fighting in the school and act accordingly.

    3) It's as reliable for self defense as anything out there and better than most.

    4) Well, a scale is difficult to use to measure without some point of reference. Compared to no training at all, Kajukenbo is very effective. Compared to an Uzi at 15 yards away, not so much. You need to give your range of effectiveness before that question can be answered. Also, remember that "self defense" is just that. It's not cage fighting, or point sparring, or kickboxing. It's being trained to avoid attacks if possible and deal with them if necessary.
     

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