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Thread: Whats the Difference?

  1. #1
    Jas0n Guest

    Whats the Difference?

    Kali-
    Arnis-
    Modern Arnis-
    Escrima-

    I thought it was all a part of the same art?

  2. #2
    diggum Guest
    it is. Or rather, they're all different names for the same basic art and concepts.

    This has been talked about in endless threads on any forum that discusses FMA. Go to google.com and search for 'Kali Eskrima Arnis differences' and you'll find more than you could read. search at groups.google.com as well. Heck, even use the search feature on this board and I know you'll find a few threads on this.

  3. #3
    pesilat's Avatar
    pesilat is offline
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    Originally posted by diggum
    it is. Or rather, they're all different names for the same basic art and concepts.

    This has been talked about in endless threads on any forum that discusses FMA. Go to google.com and search for 'Kali Eskrima Arnis differences' and you'll find more than you could read. search at groups.google.com as well. Heck, even use the search feature on this board and I know you'll find a few threads on this.
    Yup. What he said.

    With the exception of "Modern Arnis." Modern Arnis is a specific system of FMA.

    The other terms, Kali, Eskrima, and Arnis are all umbrella terms used to describe the entire family of FMA.

    Though some people do make distinctions, there really are none in practice. Any guidelines laid out for what is or isn't Kali, for instance, will be proven false by any number of systems calling themselves Kali. Same is true for the terms Arnis and Eskrima.

    Some other variations (less commonly seen, but out there) are:

    -- variants on "Eskrima" --
    Escrima
    Esgrima
    And, on a rare occasion, you'll see the term "Armis."

    In the Philippines, you'll see a lot of other terms that are used in various regions such as Pagkalikali, Estoka, Estokada, and others.


    Some other words related to the FMA (though slightly less generic in nature):
    dumog/buno - grappling
    panantukan/pangamot/suntukan/kamot-kamot - boxing
    kinomutai - biting/pinching

    There are all sorts of controversy surrounding these words but, be that as it may, these are terms you may hear related to the FMA.

    Mike
    Mike Casto


  4. #4
    Jas0n Guest

    Shrug

    kinomutai - biting/pinching
    So What your telling me is that Tyson is a Martial Artist?


    No seriously? biting? pinching?

  5. #5
    pesilat's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Jas0n
    kinomutai - biting/pinching
    So What your telling me is that Tyson is a Martial Artist?


    No seriously? biting? pinching?
    LOL. Yup.

    It's often used in grappling to distract someone to create an opening to attack or counter. It's also used to add a little extra zing in some pain compliance methods.

    The biting need not break the skin. You can pinch with your teeth. It's a pretty singular feeling and, generally, people's inherent reflex is to get away as quickly as possible before they do get bitten.

    And sometimes, it can be very destructive. Remember that the FMA are, at their root, weapon arts and, specifically, blade arts. Imagine getting pinched with the handles of a balisong ("butterfly" knife). It's very painful. Now, if the knife is closed, imagine if the pinch is deep enough that the blade cuts into you. Now you're being attacked by pruning shears.

    Or if you "pinch" using your thumb on one side of their ear (or other target) and your blade on the other side. If you're using the back of the blade (or if it's a blunt weapon instead of a blade), you're going to cause a lot of pain. If you're using the sharp edge of your blade ... off with their ear. Just be careful not to have your thumb directly opposite your blade or you'll cut your thumb, too.

    The principles from kinomutai can be employed in a wide variety of nasty ways.

    Mike
    Mike Casto


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