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Thread: Bruce Lee Death Conspiracy

  1. #1
    UK Phooey Guest

    Question Bruce Lee Death Conspiracy

    I don't really follow martial arts in the media so don't really know too much about Bruce Lee.

    In a short discussion with someone recently they suggestion there was a big conspiracy regarding the death of Bruce Lee.

    Is there any truth to this os was their nothing suspicious at all?

  2. #2
    sweeper Guest
    well.. not realy.. I tihnk that was mentioned in a book by someone or other..

    from what I understood when he was found dead the ambulance wasn't called emediatly or somthing like that and that was suppoed to mean some one poisoned him.. in my opinion if your freind takes a nap in your bead and doesn't wake up you got a little more to think about than the medics getting there...

  3. #3
    Samurai's Avatar
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    There is a book called the "TAO OF BRUCE LEE" by Davis Miller that explores some of these theories.

    Do an internet search on BRUCE LEE, DEATH, BRANDON LEE and the CURSE OF THE DRAGON and you should reveil some theories as well.

    There is NO official evidence or thought on conspiricy in the Bruce Lee Estate. Bruce's death was a result of a strong reaction to some pain medication that he was given in their minds.

    Thanks
    Jeremy Bays

  4. #4
    bob919 Guest
    he died from an allergic reaction to pain killers (i think paracetamol)

  5. #5
    yilisifu Guest
    The board of inquiry ultimately concluded that he'd died as the result of an overdose of aquagesic (very much like aspirin) which he'd taken for a headache. At first they thought it was an allergic reaction, but he'd taken it many times before with no ill effects.

    However, the odds of dying from taking too much aquagesic (or aspirin) is minimal - you'd likely just puke it up.

    A western-trained Chinese pathologist testified about his findings and didn't think aquagesic had much to do with it. He said he'd heard of a deadly art (in his youth) wherein one could be struck rather lightly and the effects of the blow would not manifest for some time...in some cases it could be fatal.

    The western physicians didn't buy this Chinese "fairy tale" and chalked it off to an OD from aquagesic.

    However......the autopsy showed that Lee's lungs were filled with blood although he hadn't been coughing much (a typical mark, according to the Chinese doctor, of a "time strike"). He died of cerebral edema (swelling of the brain) which aquagesic, OD or not, cannot cause. However, a time strike usually causes death by cerebral hemmorhage or edema or cardiac arrest.

    Years ago, I met a very well-known figure in the SF kung-fu community and he'd known Lee well. I asked him about it. He smiled and looked away. "Who did it?" I asked. He muttered, "I cannot tell you that." And that was the end of that conversation.

    True story.

  6. #6
    bob919 Guest
    i dont believe in time strikes but that sre sounds strange

  7. #7
    Samurai's Avatar
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    There is a BIG difference between hit someone and saying that you will die eating a cheeseburger on August 12, 2004 and staying that this strike takes about 2-3 weeks to kill.

    I think "Dim Mak" can , did, and does exsits. I just think we give it a little too much mystery

    Jeremy Bays

  8. #8
    Johnathan Napalm is offline Banned User
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    "time strike" ? Hot damn! What's next? Voodoo? Sticking a needle in a doll with your name on it and kill you from a hundred miles away?

    Where is the basis for all this magical stuff?

  9. #9
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    The official report states 'death by misadventure' from a cerebral edema due to an allergic reaction to the chemical meprobamate (sp?) found in the prescription painkiller equagesic.

    Supposedly, Betty Ting Pei couldn't rouse Bruce from sleep and panicked. I think instead of calling for medical help, she called Raymond Chow. By the time Bruce got to a hospital, it was too late.

    There have been many goofy stories floating around about his death: Triad assassination, death touch assassination, overdose of hashish, and there are other wingnuts who still think he's alive and the whole thing was faked.

    I'll go with the official report. Doesn't really matter anyway. Dead is dead. The hows or whys this long after his death are really unimportant.

    Cthulhu
    Expect only what happens in the fight. That way, you'll never be surprised.

  10. #10
    bob919 Guest
    just remeberesd a doctors report that says a blow to the liver can lead to its slow destruction apparently it just dies slowly then you follow it

  11. #11
    Elfan Guest
    I belive that is widely agreed that he died due to a swelling of the brain. The big question is what cuased it.

    Cthulhu's summary is acruate.

  12. #12
    Johnathan Napalm is offline Banned User
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    Here is an article on Lee's death.

    http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Makeup/2766/

    The Mystery of Bruce Lee's Death
    by Jake Seal
    Bruce Lee, dressed in the traditional Chinese outfit he wore in the movie Enter The Dragon, was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery in Seattle in late July of 1973. But long before Lee's sudden and tragic death in a Hong Kong apartment at age 32, rumors were rife throughout the Orient that he had been wounded or killed in fights.
    "One day, I got a long-distance call from Hong Kong's largest newspaper," Lee recalled. "They asked me if I was still alive. 'Guess who you are talking to?' I replied."

    Thus, when Lee actually did die, speculation abounded as to the cause. The rumors ranged from Lee being killed by Hong Kong triads (gangsters) because he refused to pay them protection money - —something that was common for Chinese movie stars to do at that time —to his being killed by an angry martial artist's dim mak (death touch) strike. Some people claimed Lee was cursed—he had just bought a house in Hong Kong that was supposed to be haunted—or that he had died while mking love to actress Betty Tingpei, or that he had angered the Chinese martial arts community by teaching foreigners, and that he had been killed in a challenge match.

    Many Chinese believed Lee was the victim of too much gum Ilk (intensity) in his training, while others cited drug use as the cause for his sudden demise. Still others believed that Lee's fate was sealed at birth, that it was in the stars. And, finally, there are those who think Lee's death was staged, and that he is merely waiting for the right time to return to society.

    The facts of the case are this: Lee died after falling into a coma. The coroner's report was inconclusive, and medical authorities came up with five reasons for Lee's untimely death. However, they all agreed that it was caused by a cerebral edema (a swelling of the brain caused by a congestion of fluid). But what caused the edema became a matter of speculation. For the most part, the course of events on that fateful July day in 1973 can be pieced together. According to Lee's wife, Linda, Bruce met film producer Raymond Chow at 2 p.m. at home to discuss the making of Game of Death. They worked until 4 p.m., and then drove together to the home of Betty Tingpei, a Taiwanese actress who was to also have a leading role in the film. The three went over the script at Tingpei's home, and then Chow left to attend a dinner meeting.

    A short time later, Lee complained of a headache and Tingpei gave him a tablet of Equagesic—a kind of super sapirin. Apart from that, Lee reportedly consumed nothing but a couple of soft drinks.

    At around 7:30 p.m., Lee lay down for a nap and was still asleep when Chow called to ask why he and Tingpei had not yet shown up for dinner as planned. The actress told Chow she could not wake Lee. The ensuing autopsy found traces of cannabis in Lee's stomach, but the significance of this discovery is debatable. Some believe the cannabis caused a chemical reaction that led to the cerebral edema, but the coroner's inquiry refutes this theory. In fact, one doctor was quoted as saying that the cannabis being in Lee's stomach was "no more significant than if Bruce had drunk a cup of tea that day."

    Dr. R.R. Lycette of Queen Elizabeth Hospital viewed Lee's death as a hypersensitivity to one or more of the compounds found in the headache tablet he consumed that afternoon. Although his skull showed no injury, his brain had swollen considerably, from 1,400 to 1,575 grams. None of the blood vessels were blocked or broken, so the possibility of a hemorrhage was ruled out. All of Lee's internal organs were meticulously examined, and the only "foreign" substance to be found was the Equagesic.

    Chow came to the apartment and could not wake Lee either. A doctor was summoned, and he spent 10 minutes attempting to revive the martial artist before sending him by ambulance to Queen Elizabeth Hospital. By the time he reached the hospital, Lee was dead .

    Foul play was immediately suspected as having a role in Lee's passing. Chow appeared on television to try to settle the public furor that quickly developed. He explained what happened, omitting only the fact that Lee had not died at home. The press soon uncovered the truth, however, and demanded to know what Chow was trying to cover up. R.D. Teare, a professor of forensic medicine at the University of London who had overseen more than 90,000 autopsies, was called in and declared that it was basically impossible for the cannabis to be a factor in Lee's death. In Teare's opinion, the edema was caused by hypersensitivity to either meprobamate or aspirin, or a combination of both. His view was accepted by authorities, and a determination of "misadventure" was stamped on Lee's death.

    Strangely, an early death was a conceivability that Lee had contemplated with surprising frequency. According to his wife Linda, he had no wish to live to a ripe old age because he could not stand the idea of losing the physical abilities he had strived so hard to achieve.

    "If I should die tomorrow," he used to say, "I will have no regrets. I did what I wanted to do. You can't expect more from life."

  13. #13
    white belt is offline
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    Lightbulb Edema

    Tensing the wrong way during exercise can cause damage to the circulatory system. The brain and neck are common sites compromised by improper practice of "Hard" Chi Kung. Lee practiced isometrics, with controlled breathing, on a regular basis. The famous wrestler "Dick the Bruiser" died around 10 (?) years ago while performing bench presses at his home. Brain hemorrhage was the cause. The Szharnovsky (splg?) Karate group is courting disaster with the internal body pressure exercises they do. If not handled properly, intense, unchecked exercise robs the body. Sometimes paid for with the highest of prices.

    white belt

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